Chevron Hassett, <i>Surveying the Surveyor</i>, 2022. Installation image, Open Window Gallery, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Image: Lucy Scanlan.

Chevron Hassett, Surveying the Surveyor, 2022. Installation image, Open Window Gallery, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery. Image: Lucy Scanlan.

Surveying Us

  • Sat 18 Jun 2022
  • 10:30—11:30AM
  • Govett-Brewster Art Gallery / Len Lye Centre
  • Free
  • All Welcome
  • Meet in foyer

Connected to Chevron Hassett’s new work Surveying the Surveyor, join the artist along with arts curator and writer Hanahiva Rose, and artist Brett Graham for a kōrero around our relationship to stolen land, responding to colonial spaces and markers, and how we can question which narratives are allowed in public spaces.

Chevron Hassett:
Chevron Hassett (Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Rongomaiwahine) and Pākehā (Irish) heritage. Hassett is a visual artist predominantly working in lens-based media, sculpture and public installation. At the heart of his practice is the essential spirit of whanaungatanga, the Māori concept of connecting, building and maintaining relationships within communities. Hassett holistically collaborates with his local communities and peoples, his recent works engage with narratives of socio-cultural identities, urban indigeneity and colonialism within Pacific and indigenous histories.


Hanahiva Rose:
Hanahiva has worked as Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art and Collections at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery and is currently an adviser at Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage, a research assistant at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, and a research assistant and curatorial intern on Oceania at the Royal Academy of Arts, London. Hanahiva is regularly published nationally for her writing on Māori and Pacific art practices in Aotearoa.


Brett Graham:
Brett Graham (Ngāti Koroki Kahukura, Tainui, b. 1967) is a sculptor who creates large scale artworks and installations that explore indigenous histories, politics and philosophies. Graham lives and works in Waiuku on the southern shore of Manukau Harbour (Auckland, New Zealand). He conceives his Māori whakapapa (ancestry) as a Pasifika / Moana identity and affiliated with a global network of indigenous and non-Western peoples. It is from this basis that Graham's work engages with histories of imperialism and global indigenous issues.

Image courtesy of Chevron Hassett.

Image courtesy of Chevron Hassett.

Image courtesy of Hanahiva Rose.

Image courtesy of Hanahiva Rose.

Image courtesy of Brett Graham.

Image courtesy of Brett Graham.

Event Info