Taranakite sample from Parwan lava caves, Bacchus Marsh, Victoria, Australia. 
Image source: https://rruff.info/Taranakite

Taranakite sample from Parwan lava caves, Bacchus Marsh, Victoria, Australia.
Image source: https://rruff.info/Taranakite

Taranakite

Digital Artist 'In Residence'

25 Jul 2020

Read the latest post by our current digital artist-in-residence, Sorawit Songsataya.

Over the next four weeks, the artist will be "in residence" at their home in Wellington, sharing insights into the development of their new project through the Govett-Brewster’s online platforms.

Look out on Instagram over the coming month as we reveal more.

Did you know that Taranaki has a mineral named after itself? Taranakite was first described in 1865 by a scientist, James Hector, and an analytical chemist, William Skey. It was the first new mineral to be identified in New Zealand.

Originally found occupying fissures in volcanic rocks on Ngā Motu/the Sugar Loaf Islands, Taranakite has since been found overseas in caves and wet coastal locations that have been inhabited by bat or bird colonies.

Although in 1865 Hector and Skey identified bird guano as the most likely source of the phosphate required to form taranakite, it was a recent research paper published in 2003 (C. A. Landis & D. Craw), that proved their speculation was correct.

 

In Residence 2020

Supported by Creative New Zealand and NPDC, this year’s Artist Residency programme will see three New Zealand-based artists take up month-long residencies from their own studios or homes.

Our three chosen artists; Sorawit Songsataya, Meg Porteous, and Yona Lee, were announced in June. Read more about the Artists ‘In Residence’ 2020.

Their artwork will be presented across the Govett-Brewster’s digital platforms over the coming months.

Follow us on Instagram, look out on our news blog or sign up to our monthly Happening email updates to keep posted as we present the ‘In Residence’ artworks.

 

CNZ